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Sunday Encounter

Sunday Encounter

A Feature film by Marc Allégret

Produced by Compagnie Commerciale Française Cinématographique (CCFC), Union des Distributeurs Indépendants de Films (UDIF)

Release in France : 19/11/1958

  • Contents

Actors (24)

Production and distribution (3)

TV Broadcasts: Cumulative total

TV broadcasts: details by country



Yet another slight French film from a director past his prime; presciently, at the same time, it signaled the debut of one of the major icons of the "Nouvelle Vague" – actor Jean Paul Belmondo, who somewhat inconsequentially here plays the second romantic lead. Two of the three stars involved, in fact, had been leading ladies since the late 1930s (Danielle Darrieux and Arletty) and whose careers had understandably started dwindling by now; the third is comic Bourvil whose career would peak during the next decade. The film is a bittersweet romance with Bourvil still pining for the woman (Darrieux) whom he had met during WWII and who had left him 5 years previously: unbeknownst to him, she is currently in a relationship with one of his war buddies and, by chance, he notices her aboard a bus and catches up with her but they part ways soon after; however, he follows her and storms the office she had entered – where he comes face to face with his ex-colleague, but then leaves in dismay. So, Bourvil concocts a plan – with the help of his landlady (Arletty), her daughter and the latter's unruly trumpeter boyfriend (Belmondo) – by which he gives appointment to Darrieux, ostensibly to discuss their divorce settlement, at his office (where he purports to impress his ex-wife by letting her believe he is top man) and, later, at a country villa actually owned by Arletty (having also borrowed his real boss' swanky car for the occasion)! Incidentally, Bourvil has to act quickly if he wants to regain the woman he loves back – since Darrieux (who even gets to sing here) is to emigrate to Canada on that same day; the titular outing, then, is fraught with incident (having taken a gun and toyed with the idea of killing her if she insists on leaving, Arletty & Co. embark on a race-against-time to stop him) but also reminiscences of their life together. Of course, this being an old-fashioned French film, our couple gets back together in the end – with Darrieux even happy that Bourvil still owns his rickety ancient car. A pleasant enough effort, then, if strictly minor (and, ultimately, pretty forgettable) fare.

Source : IMDb

Full credits (16)

Assistant Director :

Pierre Gautherin

Producers :

Jean-Jacques Vital, Edouard Harispuru

Director of Photography :

Jacques Natteau

Camera Operator :

Jean Lallier

Assistant Editor :

Roger Cacheux

Production Designer :

Maurice Colasson

Singer :

Danielle Darrieux

Still Photographer :

Henri Thibault

Adapters/dialogue writers :

Serge de Boissac, Pascal Jardin, Jean Marsan

Screenwriter :

Serge de Boissac

Sound Recordist :

Jacques Gallois

Editor :

Suzanne De Troeye

Continuity supervisor :

Colette Crochot

Music Composer :

Paul Misraki

Costume designer :

Jacques Heim

Location Manager :

Roger Boulais

Technical details

Feature film

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Original French-language productions :


Nationality :

100% French

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Runtime :

1 h 30 min

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Black & White

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